May 14

Hello, All.

Just got home from my Central Washington tour: 2 weeks, 4 different programs, 11 performances, 1,100 miles of driving; sublime, ever-changing topography, acres of blossoming apple trees, and enthusiastic hosts and audiences. I’m in awe of the Washington’s North Central Regional Library, which sponsored 10 of my appearances and wholeheartedly invests in bringing events to multiple far-flung branches, however small the venue and town (e.g., Soap Lake, pop. 1,500). My thanks to amazing Programming Librarian Kim Nehrer, who invited me to visit, flawlessly assembled the trip, and is a joy to work with.

NEXT:

NYC IN JUNE:  

A return to Greenwich Village’s Cornelia Street Café, with My Summer Vacation—stories by Sarah Orne Jewett and H. C. Bunner; Thursday, June 28, 6:00 p.m. Details below *

 

IN NEW JERSEY AND PENNSYLVANIA--NEXT WEEK

* Saturday, May 19, 3:00 p.m.

Someone Must Wash the Dishes: An Anti-Suffrage Satire  (Marie Jenney Howe) + lecture

Sponsored by the Public Scholars Program, New Jersey Council for the Humanities      

THE MUSEUM OF CAPE MAY COUNTY

504 N Route 9, Cape May Court House, NJ 08210-1953

RESERVATIONS/QUESTIONS: (609) 465-3535

FREE

* Tuesday, May 22, 1:30 p.m.

Someone Must Wash the Dishes: An Anti-Suffrage Satire  (Marie Jenney Howe) + lecture

         JOSEPH T. SIMPSON PUBLIC LIBRARY

         16 N Walnut St, Mechanicsburg, PA 17055

         RESERVATIONS/QUESTIONS: (717) 766-0171; http://www.simpsonlibrary.org/

         FREE

 

* Thursday, June 28, 6:00 p.m.

My Summer Vacation:

          H. C. Bunner’s “The Nice People” . . . are not what they seem

          Sarah Orne Jewett’s “Miss Esther’s Guest” . . . is not what she asked for

CORNELIA ST. CAFE

29 Cornelia Street, NYC, NY 10014

RESERVATIONS/QUESTIONS:

(212) 913-9819

http://www.corneliastreetcafe.com/underground/Performances.asp?sdate=6/28/2018&from_cal=0

ABOUT THE AUTHORS:

Henry Cuyler Bunner  (1855 – 1896) was for most of his professional life editor-in-chief of Puck, the earliest American comic weekly. While writing half of that magazine, he also contributed short stories regularly to Scribners, Harpers, and Century. Predating O. Henry’s, his were among the first short stories to take their themes from New York City’s melting pot metropolis.

Sarah Orne Jewett (1849 – 1909) South Berwick, Maine, where Jewett was born and died, served her well as a writer. Too frail to become a doctor, she began submitting children’s poems and stories to magazines. The adult journal Atlantic published her first Maine story. The Country of the Pointed Firs—her best-known and “finest” work—was published in 1896; that collection included “Miss Esther’s Guest.”

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